Trainer as a career



Trainer as a career

Postby vanz_4u » Tue Mar 01, 2011 11:34 pm

Being a Mainframe Fresher, will, being a trainer help me in building up my career? What salary can I expect as a beginner?
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Re: Trainer as a career

 

Re: Trainer as a career

Postby dick scherrer » Wed Mar 02, 2011 2:53 am

Hello,

I would be wary of an organization that would assign someone with little or no experience to be a trainer. . .

One of the most important things a trainer provides is good answers to student questions (anyone can show the slides and read the lecture notes). Someone with no solid foundation/experience will not be able to do this.

Starting salary is usually locale/individual deterined. I know of no guidelines the places i've been. I've met many people who perform the same tasks and their rate of pay is quite different - both within an organization and across organizations.
Hope this helps,
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Re: Trainer as a career

Postby vanz_4u » Wed Mar 02, 2011 9:49 pm

thanks for the help
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Re: Trainer as a career

Postby MrSpock » Thu Mar 03, 2011 12:23 am

Looking for career opportunities, so I'm curious. Since most positions require that you dedicate some time in the training of others, what would a dedicated trainer do? Who are you training? What sort of topics are you covering?
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Re: Trainer as a career

Postby dick scherrer » Thu Mar 03, 2011 1:41 am

Hello,

what would a dedicated trainer do


I've been involved as a technical resource with 2 types of technical training.

1.
When i had a real life (before becoming a migrant data worker), i had a career at what became the largest paper & wood products company in the world (it is now gone). Our M.I.S. (IT today) was over 500 developers (this does not include anything else such as Computer Operations, Networking, Data Entry, etc).

We had a "Training" group that was a supervisor (who also "taught"), and at least 2 full-time classroom teachers. We were big into recruiting people who were recent graduates, so a couple of times a year the "class for new rookies" was started. This took 6 to 9 months depending on what was to be covered. During this time new people learned that it didn't much matter what someone told them in college, but that there were standards/conventions that were not what is taught in the colleges.

They were taught our programming, jcl, and documentation standards to be followed with the applications they developed while in training. These were "real" requirements that had them actually working early on. When someone experienced was hired, they were shown "the rules" and placed on their team. We were big users of add-ons, so we trained our people (new and old alike) MARK-IV, Focus, Nomad, ROSCOE (developers were not given TSO logons then), Librarian, IDEAL, TOTAL, MANTIS, and much more.

2.
Miami University (Ohio) - i was a technical mentor there for almost 15 years (the difference between a tutor and a mentor is that tutors get paid :) ).
Once upon a time, Miami had one of the very best business systems analysis departments anywhere. The degree was a 4-year bachelor of science. There were entire courses for assembler, cobol, jcl, operating systems & utilities, data design and implementation, and on and on. COBOL took a full year (Sep-Jun). These were not like the current "hit the high spots" training so many receive - most had multi-requirement projects that were worked on individually and in teams.

Miami had more than 15 full-time professors spread across 3 campuses as well as several part-time instructors that taught in the evening because there were so many students.
Hope this helps,
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Re: Trainer as a career

Postby dick scherrer » Thu Mar 03, 2011 1:43 am

Add-on. . .

And there is always vendor-provided training - which involves trainers for those products.

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